WHY IS ISRAEL HOSTILE TO BUGANDA KINGDOM?

This topic contains 1 reply, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Mulongo 3 years ago.

Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #18689

    Mulongo
    Participant

    OBBI LETTER TO ISRAEL EMBASSY UK

    ISA/OBBI1/A13

    18 October 2013

    HE Ambassador Daniel Taub
    Embassy of Israel
    2 Palace Green
    London W8 4QB
    England

    Your Excellency
    RE: BUGANDA NOT SAFE – ESPECIALLY FOR IMMIGRANTS
    Olukiiko Lwa Bazzukulu Ba Buganda International is a Grassroots Organization of the Buganda Kingdom on the shores of Lake Nnalubaale (Victoria) in central Uganda. We have learnt that the Israel government is planning to send its “unwanted” immigrants to Uganda. If this is implemented, these mixed citizens of African nations will be landing at Entebbe Airport, and will most probably stay in the capital city Kampala, both in our Buganda Kingdom. We understand that this deportation is taking place in exchange for military equipment. This is happening at a time when Uganda is having social unrest as precedes a regime change. This always takes place here in Buganda and through warfare, resulting in massive loss of lives and property. At present we are preoccupied with developing a strategy to direct the changes. Now we have to stop and ask; whatever did Buganda do to Israel?

    For some historical background to our conflicts, please note that in 1962, the British Colonialists forced fifteen different groups of people to form Uganda – a chain gang of kingdoms, districts, territory, as each desired to be called. The idea was to make a single nation out of them, like eggs into an omelette. These people are as different from one another as Germans, French and English or Israelis, Greeks and Saudis. They all had values they had been defending for centuries. The forced imposition of such a union is against nature, a recipe for disaster. And disaster is exactly what the Uganda project has proved to be. This salmagundi was awarded a constitution, a certification of independence – another form of shackles.

    Buganda presented her case that no one sits above her Kabaka, for God who rules supreme occupies the position. The final arrangement saw Ssekabaka Edward Muteesa II becoming the first president of Uganda. He agreed to the union on the condition of 25 years of probation. In 1964, the prime minister, Milton Obote together with Amin Dada, then deputy commander of the Ugandan armed forces, were implicated in criminal activities in the Congo. When the Parliament demanded an investigation into the crime, Obote abrogated the constitution: the foundation of both the union and independence. Muteesa II gave Obote a two-week ultimatum to call the original 15 back to the negotiation table. Obote responded by accusing our Kabaka of planning a coup d’état. Our elders tell us that British, Israeli and Tanzanian troops helped the Ugandan forces to attack our Kabaka’s palace. Now with the agreements scrapped, the legitimate government overthrown, the Buganda Kingdom’s palace attacked and genocide carried out on its Baganda people, Buganda was automatically and legally cast out of Uganda and turned into an occupied territory.

    The war that began then has resulted in many battles that have claimed millions of our people. To date our children are murdered in sacrificial rituals, people of all sexes and ages are raped in broad daylight, bludgeoned with iron rods, burnt with acid, whole families butchered and many innocent people locked up in prisons, while frequent poisonings threaten to undo our social fibre. All this has made ours a fertile ground for diseases. There is land grabbing, disinterment of our dead, burning of schools and work places, destruction of shrines, desecration of our norms and traditions, as well as violation of the ecosystem and distortion of our history. Properties robbed, people displaced and our ancestral land auctioned off to foreigners. All these together qualify as high-key systematic genocide of the Baganda and tensions are rising toward explosion point. Uganda in general is on a free-fall descent down into the pit.

    We first read about this idea of Israel exporting its unwelcome immigrants to Uganda last year. Now we are hearing that the deal has been sealed. This is so ironic, because of all the countries of the world, ordinary Baganda think of Israel most positively. This is partly because of the Jewish birth of Christ. Most important though, it is because of your traditions that appear to have things in common with ours. Like you, we too cherish our national integrity. By tradition, we believe in humanity. In one of his speeches, our Kabaka Muwenda Mutebi II spoke about how glad he is that despite all we have and are still suffering, we remain a hospitable people. That is what keeping our faith is about. Otherwise, how can we blame those who violated us when we have been converted to unprovoked aggression? Moreover, in a world where politeness is taken as a weakness and humanity generally worthy of contempt, we still believe there is no greatness in heinous opportunism. At this point in time, we would like to make sure you are aware that just now ours is not a safe place, especially for immigrants.

    Furthermore, some news outlets have reported this as a case of racial discrimination because your government does not mention measures adopted for immigrants from other places other than Africa. We choose to doubt that, given the historical relationship between Africa and Israel. This could be the one of the reasons those immigrants chose your country –the other being that Israelis are no strangers to suffering and would understand their pain. The adages that associate old age with wisdom hold true for both individual people as they do for nations. Wisdom makes a spirit stronger. The strength of a spirit is in knowledge and understanding – the truth. There is some resemblance between the creation stories of Israel and of Buganda. However, Israel is a priest nation, which has earned it both admiration and problems. But we are not a part of Israel’s problems. Our request is that Israel would stop treating us as if we are. We would like your people to remember, that down here at the furthest branches of the Nile there is the Buganda Kingdom that wishes peace and harmony to your people, as well as all your neighbours.

    God and Buganda, One Spirit, One Living Heart
    Long live the Kabaka of Buganda Ssaabasajja Muwenda Mutebi II

    Yours faithfully
    ………………….
    Major General Elly Kigozi
    OBBI – Diaspora Secretary
    The truth will set us free.

    cc: Ssaabasajja Kabaka Muwenda Mutebi II
    cc: Traditional Leaders of the other 14 of the Original 15
    cc: Foreign missions in Uganda
    cc: Religious Leaders
    cc: Baganda Clan Heads

    #28097

    Mulongo
    Participant

    After Israel, African kids start afresh in Uganda
    June 8th, 2014

    By RODNEY MUHUMUZA*

    In this photo taken Wednesday, April 9, 2014, two South Sudanese teenagers who previously lived in Israel listen to their friends reminisce about their time in Tel Aviv, in a classroom at the Trinity boarding school where they now live in Kampala, Uganda. Some 70 South Sudanese teenagers are attending boarding school in Kampala, their new home after they were deported from Israel, or voluntarily left, and after spending months in South Sudan, a country in which they struggled because of the threat of hunger and tropical diseases, the teens later were relocated to Uganda thanks mainly to the work of an Israeli activist who has criticized his country’s policy toward African migrants as Israel’s “moment of shame.” (AP Photo/Rebecca Vassie)
    In this photo taken Wednesday, April 9, 2014, two South Sudanese teenagers who previously lived in Israel listen to their friends reminisce about their time in Tel Aviv, in a classroom at the Trinity boarding school where they now live in Kampala, Uganda. Some 70 South Sudanese teenagers are attending boarding school in Kampala, their new home after they were deported from Israel, or voluntarily left, and after spending months in South Sudan, a country in which they struggled because of the threat of hunger and tropical diseases, the teens later were relocated to Uganda thanks mainly to the work of an Israeli activist who has criticized his country’s policy toward African migrants as Israel’s “moment of shame.” (AP Photo/Rebecca Vassie)

    That’s what Ugandan teachers repeatedly tell the South Sudanese teenagers transplanted here from Israel. But Hebrew is what they speak when they are not being watched; it’s the language they grew up with as migrants.

    Some 70 South Sudanese teenagers now call Kampala their home after they were deported from — or voluntarily left — Israel, which is trying to rid itself of tens of thousands of African migrants. In recent years Africans have poured into Israel, causing friction with locals and alarming some authorities who say Israel’s Jewish character is threatened by the presence of the Africans.

    After leaving Israel the teenagers spent a few months in their home country, South Sudan, where they struggled because of the threat of hunger, tropical diseases and the country’s political tensions. They later were relocated to Uganda thanks mainly to the work of an Israeli activist who has criticized his country’s policy toward African migrants as Israel’s “moment of shame.”

    The 44-year-old activist, Rami Gudovitch, entered the lives of the teenagers as both father figure and friend, first by trying to prevent their impending deportations from Israel and then by finding families willing to sponsor their education in Africa. In December 2012 he put a group of them on a bus leaving the South Sudanese capital of Juba for Kampala, where the children hoped to return to school and start afresh as refugees. Many of those now enrolled at a private boarding school in Kampala have Israeli benefactors who pay their tuition of about $1,000, charity for which they are grateful but which doesn’t cancel the memory of the country they called home for much of their life.

    They must adjust to a different culture and school system, often without the help of family. Many students who should be one or two years away from taking college-entrance examinations are now stuck in lower grade school because their English is not adequate, a serious consequence of the transition from Israel, where they were instructed in Hebrew.

    “When they first came here they had a language barrier,” said Alex Gumisiriza, a science teacher who heads academic programs at Trinity School. “But now they are catching up.”

    Several of the teenagers who spoke to The Associated Press said they left Israel in 2011 or 2012 and lived in South Sudan before coming to Uganda. The move had effectively broken up their families, with many going months without seeing their parents. Although some said their parents had chosen to return to South Sudan in response to growing anti-refugee sentiment in Israel, many were deported.

    “We were told that in Israel they didn’t want refugees, that there were many refugees in the country,” said Victoria James, a bubbly 16-year-old student whose family lived in Tel Aviv. “It was very bad. I was going to live in a country that I knew nothing about.”

    James said she misses her friends, who occasionally chat with her on Facebook, and her teachers. Quite a few of the students said they miss Tel Aviv’s big malls, of which there are not many in Uganda. Others recall the good basketball courts there.

    Many of the African migrants pouring across Israel’s southern border with Egypt come from Eritrea and South Sudan, countries with a history of political violence and rights abuses. Israel has now built a fence along the border with Egypt, all but stopping the influx. It passed a law that allows for the migrants’ detention and said it has a deal with an unidentified country to host some of the Africans until they are able to return home.

    In this photo taken Wednesday, April 9, 2014, South Sudanese teenager Asunta Atoch, 16, left, who previously lived in Israel listens to her friends talk about their time in the country, in a classroom at the Trinity boarding school where they now live in Kampala, Uganda.
    In this photo taken Wednesday, April 9, 2014, South Sudanese teenager Asunta Atoch, 16, left, who previously lived in Israel listens to her friends talk about their time in the country, in a classroom at the Trinity boarding school where they now live in Kampala, Uganda.

    An Israeli official told The Associated Press that Israel had begun sending dozens of African migrants to Uganda in a voluntary deportation campaign that Ugandan officials and refugee authorities insist they know nothing about. While there is no formal agreement with Uganda, the Israeli official said, Israel is paying up to $3,500 to each migrant who agreed to leave for Uganda. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media on this matter.

    Migrants and activists said the arrangement, which includes a one-way ticket and a stipend, is questionable because it’s unclear if there’s an official agreement with Uganda to secure their status.

    Gudovitch, the anti-deportation activist, said he was ashamed of Israel’s policy toward African migrants.

    “Part of the Jewish tradition is to accept refugees,” he said. “I think Israel should protect refugees because we have been refugees and we don’t know the next time we shall be refugees.”

    His group, an Israeli nonprofit called Become, supports the South Sudanese students as part of its efforts to help vulnerable children in the world’s poorest parts.

    “They are Israeli kids,” Gudovitch said. “For me these kids are representative of my country.”

    *Source AP/Yahoo
    http://panafricanvisions.com/2014/israel-african-kids-start-afresh-uganda/

Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Comments are closed